Sunday, March 01, 2009

The Fifth Daily Poem Project, Week Two Call for Votes

THE FIFTH DAILY POEM PROJECT, WEEK TWO

Here are the poems to vote for in the second week of the fifth Daily Poem Project (the poems on Poetry Daily from Monday, February 23, to Sunday, March 1):

February 23: Judith Hall, The Crowded Tree
February 24: John Kinsella, A Meeting of the Birds
February 25: Barbara Hamby, Who Do Mambo
February 26: Michael Dickman, Seeing Whales
February 27: Edward Field, Cataract op
February 28: Jennifer Atkinson, Landscape with Mud Turtle
March 1: Kathleen Jesme, Small sphere (vote only on the first poem)

HOW TO VOTE: You can send your vote to me by email or as a comment on the blog. If you want to vote by commenting but do not want your vote to appear on the blog, you just have to say so in your comment (I moderate all comments on my blog). I will post comments as they come in.

Please make a final decision and vote for only one poem (although it is always interesting to see people's lists).

Please VOTE BY FRIDAY, MARCH 6! But I will still accept votes as long as I have not posted the final results. (March 8 at the latest.)

The winner of week one was Sherod Santos, Film Noir.

20 comments:

Colin Will said...

A good week, with several poems I like - Atkinson, Field and Dickman close contenders for me, but my selection is John Kinsella's A Meeting of the Birds.

Suz said...

Ooh, Ooh! I'm first! I'm voting for John Kinsella, "A Meeting of the Birds."

swiss said...

it was a close call between michael dickman and edward field, one i ahd to think about but in the end i decided to go for field.

the link to hsi home security poem is well worth checking out also

Justin Evans said...

Edward Field: Cataract Op

Andrew Shields said...

For me, it came down to Kinsella or Field, and I have decided to choose Kinsella because Field's poem seems to me to be a bit too heavy-handed in how it plays out the basic comparison it wants to make. A little less telling, a bit more trust in the showing, and it would be more effective.

Kinsella's poem, in contrast, does not wear its motivation on its sleeve, so to speak.

Anonymous said...

My vote goes to "A Meeting of the Words" by Kinsella. The poem reminded me of the numerous times I looked out the winter this past winter, seeing precisely this image as seen in this poem.

Dino

Donald Brown said...

I'm voting for Field: it's obvious in its intentions, but both experiences are deftly narrated and neatly resolved, so, as narrative poetry, it works. Dickman's poem, to me, was the more heavy-handed with it's constant reiteration about weather and then it's "get-it?" underlining of tree and these times -- while "distrusting allegory."

RC said...

Cataract op

Sorlil said...

'A meeting of the Birds' - Kinsella.

Anonymous said...

Count me in for Edward Field's "Cataract Op" this week. 'Nuf said, but ...

IF you were counting second choices, too, mine would be Barbara Hamby's "Who Do Mambo" (even though I suppose it was
thrown together on a paper placemat,
while the poet and her family were
waiting for too-slow-service in, say,
a Mexican restaurant in Toledo, Ohio).

-- dhsh

Michlt said...

I chose Dickman's 'Seeing Whales' because of it's blend of spaciousness and intimacy, it's zen like clarity, and the urge it gave me to see again the things I no longer see or have not been patient enough to see.

Question: Donald Brown, in your critique of Dickman were you actually referring to the Kinsella poem with the repeated phrase about the weather and the last line as an italicized punctuation? I could not connect your critique with Dickman's 'Seeing Whales'.

Joseph Hutchison said...

I'm for Field's "Cataract Op". I hope I'm writing as well in my 80s (if I live that long...).

Katy Loebrich said...

Jesme - Small Sphere, with Kinsella - A Meeting of the Birds as runner-up.

I am lukewarm about this week's selection, except that I really did NOT like Who Do Mambo.

Matthew said...

Atkinson is my pick.

Peter said...

Wow. Michael Dickman, Seeing Whales.

Anonymous said...

"Seeing Whales," which I think is a terrific, terrific poem.

(I too don't understand D. Brown's comments).

Donald Brown said...

Yeah, sorry, it was Kinsella's I meant, above; responding to Andrew's post. I wrote the wrong poet's name, probably because Dickman was my runner-up.

Dave King said...

I'm with Sorlil.

Doug said...

"Who Do Mambo" is kwazy. Remember Sylvia Plath's "Daddy"? But I'm going with Jesme, "Small Sphere".

Gabe said...

For me, it came down to "Meeting of the Birds" and "Landscape with Mudturtle." I have to go with "Landscape," partly because its ending was more satisfying then "Meeting," and because it reminded me of my own formative years growing up "somewhere in the swamps of Jersey" (as The Boss once put it).