Wednesday, May 07, 2008

The Fourth Daily Poem Project, Week 11 call for votes

THE FOURTH DAILY POEM PROJECT, WEEK ELEVEN

Here are the poems to vote for in week eleven of my fourth Daily Poem Project (the poems on Poetry Daily from Monday, April 28, to Sunday, May 4):

71. Question About an Old Question, by John Hollander
72. Pas de Deux, by Ciaran Carson (vote only on the first poem)
73. Belief System, by Jorie Graham
74. Slept, by Jennifer Chang
75. Shopping Urban, by Jane Shore
76. Horizontally, I Moved, by Lisa Williams
77. Sleepless in the cold dark, by Reginald Gibbons

This is the eleventh week of twelve weeks, at the end of which all the winners will be put together for a final vote.

HOW TO VOTE: Please vote for only ONE poem. You can send your vote to me by email or as a comment on the blog. If you want to vote by commenting but do not want your vote to appear on the blog, you just have to say so in your comment (I moderate all comments). (If you read this on Facebook, please vote on my blog and not as a comment on Facebook.) I will post comments as they come in (unless you tell me not to post the comment, of course).

You may vote by the title, the author's name, or the number of the poem in the list above. Please make a final decision and vote for only one poem (although it is always interesting to see people's lists).

Please VOTE BY SUNDAY, May 11! But I will still accept votes as long as I have not posted the final results, which I will do on May 12. If you would like to receive an email announcing the posting of the results, make sure to get me your email address somehow (if it is not available through your blogger profile or the like, say).

The winner of week 1 was Alison Brackenbury's "Edward Thomas's daughter."
The winner of week 2 was Martha Zweig's "Overturn."
The winner of week 3 was B. T. Shaw's "We End, Like Galileo."
The winner of week 4 was Damian Walford Davies's "Plague."
The winner of week 5 was Mary Jo Salter's "Point of View."
The winner of week 6 was Bill Zavatsky's "Ode to the Maker of Odes."
The winner of week 7 was Marie Howe's "The Star Market."
The winner of week 8 was Adam Zagajewski's "In a Little Apartment," translated by Clare Cavanagh
The co-winners of week 9 were Sidney Wade's Siamo a la Frutta and John Rybicki's Her Body Like a Lantern Next to Me.
The winner of week 10 was Elaine Sexton's Night. Fire.

7 comments:

RC said...

Horizontally,I Moved

Sorlil said...

I very much like 'Slept' by Jennifer Chang.

Gabe said...

I go with Hollander's "Question."

Katy Loebrich said...

I vote for Slept, by Jennifer Chang. I like the line "I married the owl." The rest of the poem has great imagery, too.

Speaking of great imagery, Shopping Urban, by Jane Shore is my runner-up this week because it was just so easy to see in my mind's eye & had a nice wry humor to it.

Third place this week goes to Horizontally, I Moved.

brian salchert said...

Didn't read all the poems until
today. Of the first three, John
Hollander's poem was my choice.
Read the rest today, and now I
favor "Slept".

Donald Brown said...

I'm going to vote for Gibbons because it is so swift and deft and faultless. 2nd place is probably Chang, who has an interesting voice and nice elliptic gestures, spaces to fill in. Graham, unfortunately, has taken to filling such spaces in far too much; I'd like her poem without the "armies" comment, and, like Hollander's, it seems to suffer from the excess of the "great poet." The stoning moment at the end of Graham is worth more than the rambling intro and Hollander's poem really only needs the final stanza (read it alone: see?). Lisa Williams' is interesting but too doggedly mythopoeic AND prosaic ("I couldn't see for wings"). Shore's is cute, but other than a wistful "mother forgive them, they know not what they do" it doesn't amount to much beyond its eye (and ear) for detail. Carson's really annoys me, the dud of the week.

Andrew Shields said...

My vote is for Ciaran Carson's "Pas de Deux," though I admit that I am voting for the wonderful book as much as for this individual poem.