Sunday, June 10, 2007

DPP11

THE DAILY POEM PROJECT, WEEK ELEVEN

Here are the poems to vote for in week eleven of my Daily Poem Project (the poems on Poetry Daily from Monday, June 4, to Sunday, June 10):

71. There Is A Bird We Cannot See, by Molly Lou Freeman (only the first poem)
72. Paradise, by Arthur Smith
73. Hey You, by Adrian Blevins
74. 2:09 a.m. IM , by Janet Holmes
75. Bright World, by Carl Phillips
76. The Dark-Light of Spring, by Eric Leigh
77. After Persephone, by Tracy K. Smith

You can send your vote to me by email or as a comment on the blog. If you want to vote by commenting but do not want your vote to appear on the blog, you just have to say so in your comment (I moderate all comments). In any case, I will not post the comments until after the final vote is in (secret ballot). You may vote by the title, the author's name, or the number of the poem in the list above. Please make a final decision and vote for only one poem (although it is always interesting to see people's lists).

Please VOTE BY THURSDAY, JUNE 14! But I will still accept votes as long as I have not posted the final results, which might only be on June 15 or 16.

If you want to receive an email announcing the results, send me your email address with your vote (if you have a public blogger profile, I can usually find it).

Abstaining: If you read the poems but decide that there is no poem that you want to vote for, I would be interested to know that you decided to abstain.

Week 10 results are here. A summary of the results of the first nine weeks is at the end of the week 9 results.

2 comments:

Bruce Loebrich said...

Here's my ranked list (my favorite is at the top):

76. The Dark-Light of Spring, by Eric Leigh
77. After Persephone, by Tracy K. Smith
74. 2:09 a.m. IM , by Janet Holmes
73. Hey You, by Adrian Blevins
71. There Is A Bird We Cannot See, by Molly Lou Freeman (only the first poem)
75. Bright World, by Carl Phillips
72. Paradise, by Arthur Smith

Felix said...

"There Is A Bird We Cannot See" by M. L. Freeman is my favourite this week. It's a dark, yet powerful reflection on life and the intensities of living. The bird is, perhaps, a late echo of Keats's nightingale (also with respect to the sophisticated sound patterns of the poem).